Spinosaurus was weirder than previously thought, according to new research

Stubby hind legs, a low, quadrupedal stance, and webbed feet for an aquatic life are among the features revealed by the discovery of new fossils of the dinosaur previously known from incomplete remains.

There’s been lots of media coverage about this story released today. National Geographic and the New York Times in particular have provided excellent content. Check them out to fill your head with juicy dinosaur knowledge.

There is also this cool video from the University of Chicago detailing the findings:

Newly discovered dinosaur, dreadnoughtus, was the heaviest known… and not even done growing.

paleobiology:

For the questions regarding the spinosaurus’ updated skeletal structure

Spinosaurus remains were first uncovered in Egypt about a hundred years ago, so the first is the original reconstruction, with the one you guys might recognize as the second and the unfortunately low resolution final reconstruction on bottom

With such a low body, small hind legs and large forearms, is it possible spinosaurs may have functioned as a quadroped rather than biped? It doesn’t seem able to support its front-end weight on just two legs in the position of the updated reconstruction.

dogwoof:

Dinosaur 13 - in cinemas 15th August

Dinosaur 13 chronicles an unprecedented saga in American history and details the fierce battle to possess a 65-million-year-old treasure. With consummate skill, filmmaker Todd Miller excavates layer after layer, exposing human emotion in a dramatic tale that is as complex as it is fascinating.

Based on its huge thigh bones, it was 40m (130ft) long and 20m (65ft) tall.

Weighing in at 77 tonnes, it was as heavy as 14 African elephants, and seven tonnes heavier than the previous record holder,Argentinosaurus.

Scientists believe it is a new species of titanosaur - an enormous herbivore dating from the Late Cretaceous period.

"Dinosaur 13," a documentary film about the discovery and legal battle over the T. rex known as "Sue," is coming Aug. 15.
Via ComingSoon.net: On August 15, Lionsgate will release the documentary Dinosaur 13, based on the book "Rex Appeal: The Amazing Story of Sue, The Dinosaur That Changed Science, The Law and My Life" by Peter Larson and Kristin Donnan.When paleontologist Peter Larson and his team from the Black Hills Institute made the world’s greatest dinosaur discovery in 1990, they knew it was the find of a lifetime: the largest, most complete Tyrannosaurus rex ever found. But during a ten-year battle with the U.S. government, powerful museums, Native American tribes and competing paleontologists, they found themselves not only fighting to keep their dinosaur but fighting for their freedom as well.Dinosaur 13 will be available in select theaters, On Demand and on Digital HD August 15.

"Dinosaur 13," a documentary film about the discovery and legal battle over the T. rex known as "Sue," is coming Aug. 15.

Via ComingSoon.net: On August 15, Lionsgate will release the documentary Dinosaur 13, based on the book "Rex Appeal: The Amazing Story of Sue, The Dinosaur That Changed Science, The Law and My Life" by Peter Larson and Kristin Donnan.

When paleontologist Peter Larson and his team from the Black Hills Institute made the world’s greatest dinosaur discovery in 1990, they knew it was the find of a lifetime: the largest, most complete Tyrannosaurus rex ever found. But during a ten-year battle with the U.S. government, powerful museums, Native American tribes and competing paleontologists, they found themselves not only fighting to keep their dinosaur but fighting for their freedom as well.

Dinosaur 13 will be available in select theaters, On Demand and on Digital HD August 15.

s-c-i-guy:

Amazingly Vivid Dino Illustrations Reveal a Brutal Prehistoric World

Over its lifetime, Earth has hosted countless species. But some of those species, like the dinosaurs, have managed to claw their way into a special place in our imaginations. Now, a new book illustrates the dinosaurs — and many of the beasts of millennia ago — in beautiful, spectacular and vicious style.

In one illustration, tiny Utahraptors tear at the flesh of a much larger creature. Another shows a rather unlikely but fanciful encounter between giant megalodon and funny-looking platybelodon. A more serene image depicts a well-camouflaged little dinosaur sleeping beneath a tree in a lush, green forest.

The Paleoart of Julius Csotonyi, available on May 20, is a collection of artwork by Julius Csotonyi, an award-winning illustrator whose work lives in museums and in science papers. Csotonyi, who holds a PhD in microbiology, works frequently with paleontologists who need help bringing their fossil finds to life. Sometimes, though, he draws whatever comes to mind. According to Csotonyi’s parents, his first illustration, at age 3, was of a dinosaur. “It appears to have been intended to be a rooster,” Csotonyi says in the book.

source

Real-life inspiration for Jurassic Park’s Alan Grant character — and scientific consultant on the Jurassic films — Jack Horner has won a Lifetime Achievement award from Society of Vertebrate Paleontology for his contributions to the field. Congratulations, Dr. Horner!

Jurassic Park Institute Dinosaurs (and other prehistoric animals)

Artwork by Robert Walters from the Jurassic Park Institute Dinosaur Field Guide by Dr. Thomas R. Holtz Jr and Dr. Michael Brett-Surman, Random House 2001.

This is one of my all-time favorite books. Some of it is a bit outdated by today’s standards (featherless dinosaurs everywhere - check out that therizinosaurus), but it’s still a handy guide with information on tons of dinosaurs from the Jurassic Park universe and more.